viernes, marzo 18, 2011

Para hacer la tesis en el Holoceno de la Antártida

Nos ha llegado información de una propuesta de tesis en el variación del clima del Holoceno de la Antártida. Os la adjuntamos.

PhD Position beginning August 2011: Antarctic Peninsula Holocene climate variability

The PhD research is part of the interdisciplinary and international investigation of the LARsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica (LARISSA) funded by the National Science Foundation. The major goal of LARISSA is to provide an integrated science approach to address the impact of climate change on the cryo-, bio-, hydro- and geospheres. For additional information on LARISSA visit:
http://www.hamilton.edu/expeditions/larissa

The PhD candidate will use foraminiferal data collected from a variety of sediment samples from the Antarctic Peninsula margin to interpret and reconstruct the Holocene paleoenvironmental/paleoceanographic record. The candidate will have the flexibility to focus their research on their specific interest within the purview of foraminiferal research. The candidate will have the opportunity to interact and collaborate with phytoplankton and benthic ecologists, oceanographers, ice core paleoclimatologists, marine geologists and geochemists. The student project will be carried out at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, IL USA in the Department of Geology (http://www.geology.siu.edu/index.html).

The PhD position will be funded by NSF and Departmental funds, and is contingent upon finding an appropriate candidate. The candidate will have a MS degree preferably in the Geosciences with an emphasis in Marine Micropaleontology, Paleontology, Marine Geology, Quaternary Geology or Geochemistry. Consideration will also be given to applicants with strong backgrounds in Marine Ecology/Biology that may require additional coursework. Demonstrable writing and speaking proficiency in English is required with laboratory and sea-going experience advantageous.

Please e-mail a statement of intent with your contact information by April 1, 2011 to: Dr. Scott Ishman. Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Department of Geology E-mail: sishman@siu.edu