martes, agosto 20, 2019

Los primeros océanos: no tan calientes como se pensaba


El cálculo de la temperatura de los océanos primitivos (se han sugerido temperaturas de hasta 70°C) se basa en el incremento progresivo de la proporción del isótopo de oxígeno estable más común en la Tierra (oxígeno 18) en los sedimentos de origen marino acumulados en los últimos 3500 millones de años. Sin embargo, en el artículo publicado en la revista Science se sugiere que esta variación también se puede explicar no por la influencia de la temperatura, sino por el aumento progresivo de la proporción de oxígeno 18 presente en la superficie terrestre y en el agua de mar a lo largo del tiempo. 

El trabajo en concreto muestra que la proporción de oxígeno 18 presente en los óxidos de hierro de origen marino ha ido incrementando en los últimos 2000 millones de años. Como los experimentos de precipitación de óxido de hierro revelan que la proporción de los diferentes isótopos de oxígeno en este mineral depende poco de la temperatura del agua marina, la causa principal del aumento a largo plazo de los valores de oxígeno 18 en las rocas depositadas en los mares pudo ser debida a un aumento progresivo de su proporción de en el agua de mar a lo largo del tiempo, más que al enfriamiento de los océanos. El progresivo enriquecimiento en oxígeno 18 puede haber sido debido a un aumento en la cubierta de sedimentos terrestres, un cambio en la proporción de alteración de las rocas de la corteza de alta y baja temperatura, o una combinación de estos y otros factores.

Para realizar este estudio, se analizaron muestras con óxidos de hierro de diferentes periodos geológicos, incluyendo las calizas con ooides ferruginosos presentes en la denominada “Capa de Arroyofrío” que marca el límite Jurásico Medio-Superior (hace unos 160 millones de años) de la Cordillera Ibérica.  Según Marcos Aurell, catedrático de Estratigrafía de la Universidad de Zaragoza y miembro del Grupo Aragosaurus: recursos geológicos y paleoambientales, “la participación en este trabajo de investigación pone de relieve la relevancia de los estudios locales para entender aspectos clave en la evolución global de nuestro planeta”.

Referencia del artículo https://science.sciencemag.org/content/365/6452/469


Galili, N., Shemesh, A., Yam, R., Brailovsky, I., Sela-Adler, M., Schuster, E.M., Collom, C., Bekker, A. Planavsky, N., Macdonald, F.A., Préat, A. Rudmin, M., Trela, W., Sturesson, U., Heikoop, J.M., Aurell, M., Ramajo, J. Halevy, I. (2019). The geologic history of seawater oxygen isotopes from marine iron oxides. Science 365, 469–473.



Aspecto general y de detalle de las calizas ricas en partículas esféricas (ooides) ferruginosas, que se encuentran en torno al límite Jurásico Medio-Superior (Capa de Arroyofrío) en el entorno de la Sima de San Pedro (Oliete, Teruel)

jueves, julio 25, 2019

Postdoc in Quantitative Paleobiology


The Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Indiana University seeks a postdoctoral researcher in any area of quantitative paleobiology or paleoecology, including but not limited to phylogenetics, morphometrics, stratigraphic paleobiology, conservation paleobiology, or ecometrics, with preference for someone with research interests in marine invertebrates from the Paleozoic or Mesozoic. The successful candidate will have a good publication record; be prepared to carry out an independent research program; be able to assist with occasional teaching, including up to one graduate or upper division course in quantitative paleobiology; be interested in collaborative research; and participate in mentoring graduate students in IU's geobiology group.

The appointment is for 2 years, with the possibility of renewal up to 4 years based on performance evaluation. The minimum qualifications are a Ph.D. in paleobiology or other relevant field and a strong track record of independent research. Interested candidates should review the application requirements and submit applications at: https://indiana.peopleadmin.com/postings/8148. Questions regarding the position can be directed to Professor David Polly (pdpolly@indiana.edu). Applications received by September 1, 2019, will receive full consideration, but the search will remain open until the position is filled. The expected start date is January 1, 2020.

miércoles, julio 17, 2019

PhD position on Size reductions during hyperthermal events

We seek a motivated and talented graduate student for a PhD position in the DFG founded project on “Size reductions during hyperthermal events: Early warnings of environmental deterioration or signs of extinction?”. The position is temporary for 36 months (TV-L E13, 75%) and is anticipated to start in Oktober 2019. Place of work is the GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen.

This project is one of eight new projects embedded in the successful prolongation of the interdisciplinary Research Unit FOR 2332 TERSANE: Temperature-Related Stresses as a Unifying Principle in Ancient Extinctions. The research unit combines high-resolution geological field studies with meta-analyses, physiological studies and sophisticated analysis of fossil occurrence data on ancient hyperthermal events to reveal the rate and magnitude of warming, potential causes, impact on marine life, and the mechanisms which led to ecological change and extinction. Geochemistry, analytical paleobiology and physiology comprise our main toolkits. More information on Tersane is available at: http://tersane.palaeobiology.de/


Tasks: The successful candidate will focus on paleobiological – ecological analysis of Pliensbachian-Toarcian and Permian-Triassic mollusks and brachiopods but also be involved in meta-analyses of stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental controls on size and morphology of Phanerozoic invertebrates more generally. The project will largely focus on previously collected data in high-stratigraphic resolution, but will include supplementary field work to cover within- and between facies differences before and across extinct events. Statistical analyses should be carried out, in particular in view of body size distribution and in relationship with environmental perturbations, extinction and facies changes (stratigraphic paleobiology). Fieldwork and analyses occur in connection with other projects within the Research Unit. Applicants are expected to participate in weekly informal seminar, annual workshops and international summer schools with others members of the research unit.

Qualifications:
Mandatory requirements are
M.Sc. degree in geology or biology
Experience in fieldwork
 High degree of initiative and motivation
 Ability to work as part of a team
Very good English skills
Good knowledge of statistics and R programming
Desirable are
Background in invertebrate palaeontology
Driving license

Please submit your application as a single pdf (including curriculum vitae, list of publications, statement of research interests; keyword "EarlyWarn") by the 14th of August 2019 to kenneth.debaets@fau.de

Full-time Senior Paleontologist

Location: Pasadena, CA
Applied EarthWorks, Inc. (Æ) has an immediate opening a full-time Senior Paleontologist / Project Manager in our Pasadena, CA office. The Senior Paleontologist / PM will identify paleontological services needed for specific projects, discussing these services with Æ’s Paleontology Program Manager and clients; recognize staffing needs and collaborate with Æ’s Paleontology Supervisor; and prepare scopes of work, cost proposals, and schedules for services. The successful candidate also will assist with business development and marketing Æ’s paleontology services.

http://www.appliedearthworks.com/senior-paleontologist


DUTIES:
Typical job duties will include: oversee technical specifications and ensure the accuracy and timeliness of teams executing work; prepare scopes of work and budgets to ensure they properly align services with project needs and meet/exceed best management practices; prepare or review technical reports, management plans, and other compliance documents prepared by junior staff; oversee proactive tracking and oversight of project status, resourcing and priorities for projects; and assist all members/roles in prioritizing workflow.


SKILL REQUIREMENTS:
Comprehensive understanding of geology, paleontology, biology, paleoecology, stratigraphy, and biostratigraphy.
Ability to identify regulatory compliance needs based on project descriptions, regulatory context, and construction design.
Experience writing technical reports, management plans, and other documents at all levels of compliance.
Strong written and verbal communication skills with clients and staff.


EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:
Must meet the Society of Vertebrate Paleontologists (SVP) qualifications for Principal Investigator/Project Paleontologist. Candidates must have:
M.A. or Ph.D. degree in paleontology or geology and/or a publication record in peer-reviewed journals.
Demonstrated competence in field techniques, preparation, identification, curation, and reporting in California.
At least two full years of professional experience as assistant to a Project Paleontologist with administration and project management experience, as supported by a list of projects and referral contacts.
Proficient in recognizing fossils in the field and determining their significance. Expertise in western geology, stratigraphy, and biostratigraphy. Experience in field collection and laboratory processing of fossils, preferably a range of biota.
Preference will be given to candidates with prior paleontological and project management experience in an environmental compliance setting, including successful authorship of past CEQA and/or NEPA documents, in Southern California.

HOW TO APPLY:
Interested applicants may submit a letter of interest, resume/curriculum vitae, a technical writing sample and list of three professional references to Human Resources at info@appliedearthworks.com. Please reference “Senior Paleontologist” in the subject line. No phone calls please.

viernes, julio 05, 2019

Collections Manager – Invertebrate Paleontology

The University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute seeks a collection manager to oversee its world-class research collections in invertebrate paleontology.  The collections consist of extensive invertebrate fossil and micro-fossil specimens, along with archives and library holdings.  The collections have strengths in Cambrian, Carboniferous and Cretaceous fossils, microfossils, echinoderms, brachiopods, and arthropods, and fossils from Antarctica.  University curators and students, and national and international scholars, use the collections extensively for research and education.  The collection manager is responsible for day-to-day activities in the collection and reports to the curator-in-charge.  This is a full-time (12-month appointment), non-tenure track position.

Duties include:

·         Collection management and conservation of the various collections.
·         Acquisition and collection development in conjunction with curators and students.
·         Museum operational service including day-to-day care and use of the collections.
·         Continue development and enhancement of collection database.
·         Supervision and training of graduate and undergraduate research assistants and students, and volunteers.
·         Professional development to maintain currency in and advance the field.
·         Other duties as appropriate.
Required qualifications include:

·         Master's degree or Ph.D. in museum studies, geology, systematics, or paleontology from an accredited university, or a bachelor’s degree plus 5 years experience working with museum collections in a position with similar responsibilities.
·         Working knowledge of the taxonomy and identification of invertebrate fossils.
·         Demonstrable knowledge of care and management of natural history collections.
·         Familiarity with biodiversity informatics.
And preference will be given to applicants with:

·         Expertise in one or more taxa that constitute divisional strengths and programmatic priorities.
·         Field experience collecting invertebrate fossil specimens.
·         Experience preparing invertebrate fossil specimens.
A complete application will include (1) a letter of application addressing qualifications, (2) CV, (3) statement of collection management philosophy, (4) names and email address of three individuals who can write a letter of recommendation, and (5) representative publications (the latter is optional). More information and a complete position description may be obtained by contacting:

·         Bruce S. Lieberman, Biodiversity Institute, Division of Invertebrate Paleontology, Senior Curator, blieber@ku.edu
·         Jaime Keeler, Biodiversity Institute Business Coordinator, jrkeeler@ku.edu


Application review begins 3 September 2019.  EO/AA.  We celebrate diversity in all life forms and minorities, women, veterans and those with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply. The University of Kansas values candidates who have experience working with students from diverse backgrounds and possess a strong commitment to improving access to higher education for historically under-represented minorities. ​

To apply go to: http://employment.ku.edu/staff/14823BR

The Paleontological Society seeks to support undergraduate students interested in a career in paleontology who plan to attend the Geological Society of America meeting

The Paleontological Society seeks to support undergraduate students interested in a career in paleontology who plan to attend the 2019 Geological Society of America meeting in Phoenix, Arizona (Sept 21-25, 2019).

A limited number of grants are available to offset travel costs: $1,000 if the undergraduate is presenting original research at GSA and $500 if the undergraduate is just attending the meeting.

In addition to travel support, students will participate in mentoring opportunities with professional paleontologists and graduate students while at the meeting and receive a free 1‐year student membership to the Paleontological Society

In exchange, PS‐SAP students will be expected to volunteer at the PS booth for at least 5 hours during the meeting, and to use social media (e.g., blogs, Facebook, Twitter) to communicate to the Society about their experience at the meeting. In this way, students will serve as “ambassadors” for the Society.

To be eligible, students must be enrolled as an undergraduate student at an institution of higher education, have a stated interest in learning more about careers in paleontology, and be willing to use social media to promote PS activities at the conference. Students with diverse backgrounds (including race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, neurodiversity, accessibility, first-generation college, etc.) are encouraged to apply.

All documents must be received by Thursday, August 1, 2019.

For more info, please see:
https://paleosoc.org/students/paleontological-society-student-ambassador-program/

martes, julio 02, 2019

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Palaeontology and Stratigraphy, University of Queensland

Robert Day Postdoctoral Fellowship in Palaeontology and Stratigraphy, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland, Australia

Posting Date: 29 June 2019
Closing Date: 25 July 2019

The School of Earth and Environmental Sciences delivers practical solutions to the complex issues that affect our physical environment and how we interact with it. Our interconnected teams of earth scientists, physical and social scientists, environmental management specialists, health and safety experts, and urban planners work together to address the increasingly critical global challenges of a growing population, climate change, urbanisation, food security, conservation and natural resource management. Researchers, teachers and students from around the world are drawn to our vibrant academic environment at UQ’s stunning St Lucia campus. We house world-class research facilities and have access to unique fieldwork locations in Australia and abroad. UQ’s research excellence in earth and environmental sciences is world renowned, and is reflected by our consistent high ranking in respected global league tables. The School also has an excellent success rate in nationally competitive grants and a strong record of high quality publications.

The role
The successful appointee will engage in original research in the field of palaeontology or stratigraphic palaeontology. Research should be relevant to Queensland and the appointee will be encouraged to apply for his/her own research funding. The successful candidate will be part of a diverse team of research professionals and students aimed at fundamental and applied palaeontological research.

The person
Applicants should possess a PhD in relevant disciplines. You should also have a strong desire to develop a successful and highly-productive research career in palaeontology/stratigraphy, good general research skills, a strong methodological background, excellent statistical and analytic skills, very strong writing abilities, and the capacity to work within multidisciplinary research teams.

The University of Queensland values diversity and inclusion and actively encourages applications from those who bring diversity to the University. Please refer to the University’s Diversity and Inclusion webpage (https://staff.uq.edu.au/information-and-services/human-resources/diversity) for further information and points of contact if you require additional support. 

Accessibility requirements and/or adjustments can be directed to recruitment@uq.edu.au. 

Remuneration
This is a full-time, fixed term (12 months) appointment at Academic level A. The remuneration package will be in the range $84,878 - $90,982 p.a., plus employer superannuation contributions of up to 17% (total package will be in the range $99,307 - $106,449 p.a.).

The University of Queensland also offers other competitive options including salary sacrificing, on campus childcare, leave packaging and discounted private health insurance as well as many other benefits.

Position Description
https://secure.dc2.pageuppeople.com/apply/TransferRichTextFile.ashx?sData=UFUtVjMtdOZ5XErV90K9zN89SVPdZo_JoaXswXEyxaVvimz6v2lLBL-PlfgYR-Yd6JIRFiObHpggBOLLdJwcIpkqujg_ipd2KCgCuIGO3BJcPI3j9vbfQ9UF8jZiAbpR3EObjM_Q7n-yELNTFozKBnPzo7agAA%7e%7e

PhD Research Fellowship in Marine ecology/geology is available at University of Oslo

A position as PhD Research Fellowship in Marine ecology/geology is available at the Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Norway. Starting date no later than 1st October 2019.

The position is part of the research project The Nansen Legacy. The Nansen Legacy (http://nansenlegacy.org ) is the Norwegian Arctic research community's joint effort to establish an understanding of a changing marine Arctic climate and ecosystem. The project will provide a scientific knowledgebase needed for future sustainable resource management in the transitional Barents Sea and the adjacent Arctic Basin. It is a collaborative project between ten Norwegian research institutions, and will run from 2018 to 2023. Activities in the project will include international cooperation, and several cruises with the new, ice-going research vessel Kronprins Haakon.

The PhD project is part of Research Foci RF3 (The living Barents Sea) and RF1 (Physical drivers).  RF3 focuses on biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and environmental forcing of the northern and central Barents Sea. The candidate will characterize living benthic foraminifera (protists) in contrasting environments in the northern Barents Sea and adjacent slope in terms of biodiversity, abundance, biomass, distribution patterns etc. This includes analyses of how physical and chemical characteristics of the substrate and water masses may impact benthic foraminiferal community structure, possible migration patterns and abundance change of species in relation to retreating sea-ice, and identification of major drivers along a south-north transect and between seasons in high latitudes. The outcome of RF3 will be used in RF1 to interpret changes in sea-ice distribution, paleoproductivity, and related environmental conditions during the past 2 kyrs. The candidate will attend cruises, collect sediment cores for past and present-day ecological analyses, and perform experiments on trophic aspects of benthic foraminifera.

Application deadline: 15th August 2019.

The application with attachments must be delivered in our electronic recruiting system, please follow the link "apply for this job". Foreign applicants are advised to attach an explanation of their University's grading system. Please note that all documents should be in English (or a Scandinavian language).

For further details, please see
https://www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/172386/phd-research-fellowship-in-marine-ecology-geology

miércoles, junio 12, 2019

Museum Specialist (Paleontology). American Museum of Natural History

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

NOTICE OF JOB OPENING

Date: June 11, 2019

Job Title: Museum Specialist (Paleontology)

Responsibilities & Duties:
The responsibilities and duties of the position include preparation and restoration of invertebrate fossils, including detailed microscope-based
preparation using a full range of mechanical and chemical methods as
well as digital preparation, such as SEM and CT image post-processing;
creating molds and casts; thin-section preparation; laboratory
operations management, including equipment and supply maintenance;
research support, including data collection; interaction with and
support of students and visiting scientists as appropriate; and other
divisional tasks as assigned. May have opportunities to participate in
field work.

Required Qualifications:
Bachelor’s degree or equivalent professional experience (typically at
least 4 years of specimen preparation) required. Demonstrated high level
of professional skill, innovation, and cooperativeness. Outstanding
manual dexterity and hand-eye coordination, attention to detail, and
patience. Good organizational skills and ability to work independently.

Preferred Qualifications:
Bachelor's degree in related field plus at least one full year of
practical experience in preparation, molding and casting. Knowledge of
invertebrate fossils desired.

Interested parties should apply online:
http://careers.amnh.org/postings/1900

Review of applications will begin as early as July 15th; position
remains open until filled.

Applications cannot be accepted via email or snail mail.

lunes, junio 10, 2019

VIII Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios

Nos ha llegado información de las

Las VIII Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno que se celebrarán del 5 al 7 de septiembre próximos.

Se acaba de publicar la tercera circular e información relacionada de las Jornadas (normas de resúmenes y plantilla,l formulario de inscripción), que se pueden consultar en los enlaces siguientes:

martes, junio 04, 2019

CONVOCATORIA DE EXCAVACIONES PALEONTOLÓGICAS (DINOSAURIOS) SALAS DE LOS INFANTES (BURGOS) XVI CAMPAÑA. JULIO DE 2019



El Colectivo Arqueológico y Paleontológico de Salas de los Infantes (Burgos), convoca la XVI Campaña de Excavaciones Paleontológicas en yacimientos de restos fósiles de dinosaurios, en la Sierra de la Demanda.

- Se realizarán las siguientes actividades:

-    Excavación del yacimiento de Valdepalazuelos-Tenada del Carrascal (Torrelara, Burgos).
-    Limpieza de yacimientos icnológicos de la zona de Lara.
-    Además del trabajo de campo se tiene previsto llevar a cabo actividades complementarias: conferencias formativas, visita al Museo de Dinosaurios de Salas, etc.

- El equipo de excavadores estará formado por 20 personas, quedando 5 plazas disponibles, con preferencia para estudiantes universitarios de Geología y Biología, Restauración o titulados con experiencia previa en excavaciones paleontológicas.

- Se podrá ampliar hasta 5 plazas más para personas de la comarca interesadas.

- Las fechas en las que se desarrollará serán entre el 5 y el 19 de julio de 2019, en horario de mañana y tarde, de lunes a sábado, domingo excepcionalmente.

- El precio fijado para los asistentes es de 150 €.

- La participación en la excavación incluye alojamiento, manutención, seguro y certificado/diploma acreditativo.

  - La preinscripción se realizará enviando la ficha-modelo hasta del 14 de junio de 2019

    Por correo electrónico: caspaleontologia@gmail.com Asunto: excavaciones 2019.

Los seleccionados recibirán la notificación de aceptación durante los días siguientes al final del plazo de preinscripción.

Para más información:
http://www.fundaciondinosaurioscyl.com/es/c/excavaciones
caspaleontologia@gmail.com
museodesalas@salasdelosinfantes.net
Tel. 947 397001 (Museo de Dinosaurios de Salas de los Infantes, Burgos)

Evolución de las faunas fósiles de aves del Cuaternario de Aragón y del norte de la península ibérica

La aragosaurera Carmen Núñez Lahuerta defiende el próximo jueves 6 de junio a las 11 horas su tesis doctoral titulada: "Evolución de las faunas fósiles de aves del Cuaternario de Aragón y del norte de la península ibérica.". En este trabajo, la autora presenta los resultados en sus investigaciones sobre el registro de aves fósiles en varios yacimientos del Pleistoceno y el Holoceno de Aragón, Atapuerca y otras localidades. 

El acto es el edificio de Geológicas de la Universidad de Zaragoza y la entrada es libre. 

jueves, mayo 30, 2019

Postdoctoral Research Associate in paleobiology at the University of Connecticut

The Department of Geosciences at the University of Connecticut invites applications for a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the area of paleobiology.  Information about the Department and University can be found atwww.geosciences.uconn.edu.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

Candidates must have a PhD in the geosciences, biosciences or related field, focusing in the area of paleobiology before the start date.  A successful candidate should have the ability to produce high quality research in a fast paced environment.

PREFERED QUALIFICATIONS

Expertise in the arthropod group Ostracoda, experience with the Paleobiology database, molecular biology and lake systems.  Ability or experience in grant writing is also preferred, but not necessary.

APPOINTMENT TERMS

This is an 11-month, full time position with healthcare benefits.  Salary will be $50,004-$55,000 contingent on post degree experience.  A travel allowance will also be provided up to $2000.

TO APPLY

Please apply online at UConn Jobs via http://jobs.uconn.edu/, Staff Positions, Search # 2019580. Interested candidates should submit a cover letter, CV, research statement and contact information for at least three references.  Applications will be accepted until the position is filled, or until September 1, 2019.  Anticipated start date is at completion of search, but not later than January 1, 2020.  Applications and questions should be directed to Dr. Lisa Park Boush (lisa.park_boush@uconn.edu).

Employment of the successful candidate is contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment criminal background check. (Search #2018580)

All employees are subject to adherence to the State Code of Ethics which may be found at http://www.ct.gov/ethics/site/default.asp

miércoles, mayo 29, 2019

Full Professor of Paleontology. University of Hohenheim’s

The University of Hohenheim’s (UHOH) Faculty of Natural Sciences
invites applications for the position of a FULL PROFESSOR (W3) OF
PALEONTOLOGY to be filled in the Institute of Biology, which is to be
newly established. At the State Museum of Natural History (SMNS), the
position is to be filled as the DIRECTOR OF THE PALEONTOLOGY DEPARTMENT.

The joint position is to be filled by the SMNS and the UHOH as a double
appointment according to the “Jülich Model”. This means that the
appointment at the University includes granting an immediate leave of
absence to fulfill duties at the SMNS. The position is initially limited
to five years with the possibility of an extension as a permanent
contract.

The SMNS is one of Germany’s most renowned natural science research
museums and cooperates closely with the UHOH in research and academic
teaching.

For full job description, please visit
https://www.naturkundemuseum-bw.de/stellen/full-professor-w3-paleontology-director-paleontology-department

We look forward to your electronic application via
https://www.uni-hohenheim.de/prof-appt-portal until JULY 14, 2019.

martes, mayo 28, 2019

Un estudio internacional obtiene genomas mitocondriales del bóvido fósil endémico de las Islas Baleares Myotragus balearicus

La revista Quaternary Science Reviews ha publicado un estudio sobre el análisis de hasta 13 genomas mitocondriales completos o parciales obtenidos de huesos de entre 4.000 y 12.000 años de antigüedad del bóvido extinto de las Islas Baleares, , procedentes de yacimientos paleontológicos de la isla de Mallorca.

Este bóvido endémico, descrito por primera vez por Miss Dorothea M. A. Bate en 1909, vivió en las islas de Mallorca, Menorca, Cabrera y Sa Dragonera, y ha sido considerada una de las especies más representativas de las faunas insulares del Mediterráneo por las características anatómicas peculiares adquiridas durante su largo proceso en condiciones de aislamiento. Se trataba de un caprino de pequeño tamaño (los individuos adultos más grandes tenían una altura de unos 50 cm), con órbitas oculares frontalizadas, huesos de las extremidades cortos y robustos, y con una reducción proporcional del tamaño del cerebro, entre otras características.

El análisis filogenético de la secuencia completa de unos de los genomas permite indicar relaciones de parentesco del bóvido balear con el takin (Budorcas taxicolor), un caprino actualmente distribuido en las zonas  montañosas del Himalaya, así como descartar su relación filogenética directa con el género Ovis, tal como estudios anteriores habían sugerido. Debido a que todos los genomas proceden de muestras encontradas en cuevas de la Serra de Tramuntana de Mallorca, no se ha podido realizar un análisis minucioso sobre la paleodemografía de esta especie en las dos islas principales que habitaba, aunque sí que han demostrado la presencia de individuos con un estrecho parentesco en la misma zona durante casi 4.000 años, o la presencia de más de una línea materna en la misma zona de forma coetánea, es decir, genomas mitocondriales con mutaciones diagnósticas generadas con miles de años de diferencia.    

Este estudio supone un avance en el análisis filogenético de esta especie emblemática de la paleontología insular a nivel mundial, así como permite seguir ampliando el rango geográfico por lo que respecta a la viabilidad de la aplicación de metodologías paleogenéticas a materiales procedentes de ambientes poco propicios para la conservación de ADN como son las islas mediterráneas.
   
El estudio ha sido liderado por el aragosaurero Pere Bover, investigador ARAID en el Instituto Universitario de Investigación en Ciencias Ambientales (IUCA) de la Universidad de Zaragoza y el Dr. Joan Pons, científico titular en el Institut Mediterrani d’Estudis Avançats (IMEDEA, CSIC-UIB) de Mallorca, y ha contado con la colaboración de científicos del IMEDEA, el Australian Centre for Ancient DNA de la University of Adelaide (Australia) y el Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (CSIC-UPF) de Barcelona.

Link al artículo: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2019.05.005

Foto: cráneo de Myotragus balearicus procedente de la Cova Genovesa (Manacor, Mallorca)

lunes, mayo 27, 2019

Assistant Professor in the area of deep-time paleoclimate modeling

The Department of Geosciences at the University of Connecticut invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the area of deep-time paleoclimate modeling and the interactions between climate, topography and precipitation. The successful candidate will complement existing department strengths in tectonics and Cenozoic paleoclimate research and will be a key member of the growing atmospheric and paleoclimate program at UConn. More information about faculty research and graduate programs in Geosciences at UConn can be found at earth.uconn.edu.

Details for the position can be found at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/13799 or through www.jobs.uconn.edu.

miércoles, mayo 15, 2019

applications for the Vokes Grants-in-Aid. Florida Museum

This award supports paleobiological research in the Invertebrate Paleontology Collection at the Florida Museum of Natural History by advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Typically, we award one to two grants of up to $500 per year.

The Invertebrate Paleontology Collection at the Florida Museum of Natural History contains over 3.5 fully curated specimens from the southeastern United States, circum-Caribbean, South America, and Antarctica. Please consult our collection overview (https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/invertpaleo/collections/) and database (http://specifyportal.flmnh.ufl.edu/ip/) for specific information on areas and taxa of interest.

The complete overview of the application process and requirements is located at the following page: https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/invertpaleo/grants/nationwide/. Applications and letters of support are due July 1st via email. Successful candidate(s) will be notified of selection by July 15th. The collections visit must be completed within the year and acknowledgment of the Vokes Grants-in-Aid Program in any publication related to research conducted while at the Florida Museum of Natural History is required.

miércoles, mayo 08, 2019

Curator of Paleontology, Alabama Museum of Natural History (ALMNH)


The Department of Research and Collections of the University of Alabama Museums is seeking a highly-motivated researcher in the area of paleontology. The paleontology collections at the Alabama Museum of Natural History date back to the mid 1800s and include over 25,000 specimens. The collection is made up of vertebrate, invertebrate and paleobotanical specimens and boasts many unique and important specimens including several holotypes and arguably the most complete Clidastes propython mosasaur specimen known (Artemis). The ALMNH also maintains an extensive collection of extant vertebrates that are useful for comparative studies (osteological specimens, study skins, and wet specimens). This position will oversee a fully functional fossil preparation laboratory adjacent to the collection as well as a 130-acre paleontological field station in Dallas County, AL. Areas of research focus could include but are not be limited to: systematics, functional or evolutionary morphology, paleoecology, and biomechanics. The ALMNH is also interested in connecting paleontological research with our visitors and the local community.

The Curator of Paleontology is responsible for managing the paleontological collections including, in conjunction with the Director, Research and Collections, developing plans for maintenance and expansion. Writing proposals to fund the collection and create synergies with faculty and other researchers promoting deposition of specimens in the ALMNH collections. Creating and maintains an active research program focused on the paleontology collections. Managing a budget for paleontological activities and administering grants and proposals for paleontology collections. Managing Harrell Station, ALMNH's paleontological field station. Oversees the recruitment and coordination of ALMNH paleontological assistants and volunteers. Teaches one course per year in paleontology, geology or a related field. Assists with development of policies and processes conforming to best practice standards for the long-term preservation and conservation of specimens within the collections.

Qualifications and Required Application Materials: Ph.D. in Geology or Biology with specialization in Paleontology and one (1) year of college level teaching experience. Job close date 5/31/2019. Visit UA's employment website at staffjobs.ua.edu (job no. 508814) for more information and to apply. The University of Alabama is an equal-opportunity employer (EOE) including an EOE of protected vets and individuals with disabilities.

http://staffjobs.ua.edu/cw/en-us/job/508814/curator-of-paleontology-508814

lunes, mayo 06, 2019

Descubierta una nueva especie de cangrejo fósil en el Pirineo Aragonés


Los crustáceos decápodos son un grupo de Artrópodos muy común en todos los mares actuales y han llegado a colonizar las aguas dulces e incluso medios terrestres. A este grupo pertenecen organismos tan comunes y abundantes como las gambas y los cangrejos. Actualmente los ambientes más ricos en especies (con mayor diversidad) son aquellos que se encuentran en zonas arrecifales tropicales. Ahora un estudio publicado por la revista Journal of Crustacean Biology de la editorial Oxford Academic recoge el estudio de un nuevo cangrejo encontrado en rocas del pirineo aragonés. 


El estudio ha sido realizado por miembros del Grupo Aragosaurus-IUCA de la Universidad de Zaragoza. Fernando-Ari Ferratges, primer firmante del trabajo comenta “Encontrar Aragolambrus en rocas del pirineo aragonés ha sido una sorpresa ya que se trata de uno de los representantes más antiguos y completos de su familia”. Las rocas donde fue encontrado datan del periodo Eoceno inferior, hace aproximadamente 50 millones de años. En aquel momento la zona comprendida entre las localidades de Puebla de Roda y Arén, en Huesca, estaban cubiertas por un mar poco profundo donde proliferaron los arrecifes de coral y que sostenían una diversidad muy grande de animales marinos, similar a lo que ocurre en los arrecifes modernos. Samuel Zamora investigador del IGME y autor del trabajo dice “Los arrecifes de coral son sin duda uno de los ambientes más ricos en invertebrados marinos, y en nuestra zona de estudio podemos explorar como eran estos ecosistemas hace millones de años”. 


Este trabajo es parte de una investigación más general que se está desarrollando en la Universidad de Zaragoza y que trata de conocer mejor los arrecifes fósiles del Pirineo y las faunas marinas que los habitaban. Marcos Aurell, catedrático de estratigrafía de la Universidad de Zaragoza y co-autor del trabajo indica “los arrecifes fósiles del pirineo son excepcionales y el estudio de las faunas que albergaron va a permitir conocer mejor cómo han evolucionado estos sistemas a lo largo del tiempo”. Hay que resaltar que los arrecifes de coral actuales son uno de los ambientes más sensibles ante los cambios climáticos que estamos experimentando, y su estudio a lo largo del tiempo puede predecir  cómo reaccionarán ante cambios ambientales como el incremento de la temperatura global o la contaminación. 


Paralelamente a este estudio, el Gobierno de Aragón, administración pública responsable del patrimonio paleontológico (inventario, protección, conservación, etc.), ha promovido un estudio de catalogación de yacimientos de decápodos de Aragón. Los decápodos, en particular, son objeto continuado de expolio en la Comunidad Autónoma de Aragón. Luchar contra el expolio y la pérdida de información científica y patrimonial que esto supone y concienciar a la sociedad de que se trata de un recurso a respetar por todos es una prioridad actual para la Dirección General de Cultura y Patrimonio y para el resto de instituciones implicadas en el estudio. Los ejemplares de Aragolambrus estarán próximamente expuestos en el Museo de Ciencias Naturales de la Universidad de Zaragoza para que la ciudadanía pueda disfrutar de ellos.

Enlace al artículo: https://academic.oup.com/jcb/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/jcbiol/ruz014/5481906?redirectedFrom=fulltext


jueves, abril 25, 2019

Un yacimiento de dinosaurios de Teruel lleno de jovencitos


Un trabajo llevado a cabo entre la UPV/EHU y la Universidad de Zaragoza ha realizado un profundo análisis de fósiles de dinosaurio de La Cantalera-1, uno de los yacimientos ibéricos del Cretácico inferior con mayor diversidad de vertebrados. Han estudiado la estructura de los tejidos fosilizados de los huesos, así como los procesos de fosilización. Según han podido comprobar, la mayor parte de los dinosaurios encontrados en La Cantalera-1 eran individuos juveniles.

El yacimiento de La Cantalera-1 está situado en Teruel y considerado como muy importante por la comunidad científica, por ser uno de los yacimientos de la península ibérica con mayor diversidad de vertebrados del Cretácico inferior. Datado de hace unos 130 millones de años, se han descubierto restos de dinosaurios, mamíferos, cocodrilos, pterosaurios, lagartos, tortugas, anfibios y peces. Un trabajo de investigación multidisciplinar, llevado a cabo por investigadores de los departamentos de Estratigrafía y Paleontología y de Mineralogía y Petrología de la Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología de la UPV/EHU, junto con la Universidad de Zaragoza (Grupo Aragosaurus-IUCA), ha estudiado tanto el proceso de fosilización (tafonomía) que siguieron parte de esos restos, así como la estructura interna que presentan los huesos (paleohistología).

Aunque se trata de un yacimiento muy estudiado dada su importancia, “ninguna investigación anterior lo había abordado desde estas perspectivas ni con la profundidad con que lo hemos hecho en este estudio”, comenta Leire Perales-Gogenola, miembro del Departamento de Estratigrafía y Paleontología de la UPV/EHU y primera autora del estudio.

Para su trabajo, escogieron dos grupos de dinosaurios, el de los ornitópodos (cuyos restos son abundantes en el yacimiento), y los anquilosaurios (conocidos como dinosaurios acorazados, por poseer una armadura de placas óseas). Aunque cuentan con piezas fósiles grandes, este grupo de investigación recurrió a “restos fragmentarios, pequeños trozos de hueso, y los huesos dérmicos. La metodología que debíamos seguir implica realizar cortes en las muestras, y no quisimos dañar las piezas más importantes”, destaca la investigadora.
 

Ecosistema palustre con abundantes individuos juveniles

La parte del estudio de las estructuras internas de los huesos fósiles (paleohistología), “reveló que la mayoría de los dinosaurios ornitópodos eran individuos juveniles. Los huesos fosilizados, al inspeccionarlos por el microscopio, muestran la misma estructura que los huesos sin fosilizar, pues conservan todas sus características. Esto nos permite identificar los signos que nos indican si pertenecían a individuos adultos o inmaduros; se puede saber, por ejemplo, si se está tratando con un dinosaurio grande pero juvenil, o si se trata de un dinosaurio pequeño pero adulto”, explica la bióloga y paleontóloga de la UPV/EHU. En el estudio de la parte interna de los huesos dérmicos, por su parte, observaron “una serie de rasgos que otros investigadores habían asociado con un grupo específico de anquilosaurios, por lo que pudimos determinar con mayor precisión, en algunos casos, de qué tipo de dinosaurios se trataba”.

Para el estudio tafonómico, por otra parte, la investigadora remarca la utilidad de haber analizado restos fragmentarios, “ya que son huesos que sufrieron fracturas, por la presión propia del enterramiento posterior, entre otras causas, y eso hizo que por esas fracturas se pudieran filtrar diferentes materiales sedimentarios, que han quedado fosilizados junto con los restos óseos, lo cual da una información muy valiosa sobre el ambiente en el que se encontraban”. En esta parte del estudio pudieron deducir que esos huesos sufrieron un enterramiento rápido, y llegaron pronto al nivel freático, en el cual ya se dieron los procesos de fosilización. Además, se ha detectado actividad microbiana en los huesos, presencia de bacterias formando tapetes microbianos, y eso probablemente favoreció el proceso de fosilización.

Los resultados obtenidos han servido para aumentar el conocimiento que se tenía del yacimiento, y, básicamente, han “confirmado las características del ecosistema y el grado de maduración de los individuos allí presentes, que habían sido ya descritos en estudios anteriores. Los datos indican que fue un ecosistema palustre, y servía de zona de abastecimiento para la fauna del lugar. Por la abundancia de individuos juveniles y restos de cáscara de huevo, que también son muy abundantes en el yacimiento, se ha sugerido que podría corresponder a una zona de cría o de alimentación”, detalla Perales-Gogenola.

Próximos estudios en este yacimiento previstos por la Universidad de Zaragoza abordarán la paleohistología de otros dinosaurios presentes en La Cantalera-1, así como profundizarán en la edad de la muerte de los dinosaurios herbívoros, para certificar si se trata de una población natural o hay una sobredimensión de los juveniles por cuestiones de depredación de dinosaurios terópodos (dinosaurios carnívoros que pudieron atacar con más frecuencia a individuos juveniles que a individuos adultos).

martes, abril 23, 2019

Post-doctoral Fellowship in Paleobiology and Outreach Education, Stanford University



The Paleobiology Laboratory at Stanford University seeks a post-doctoral scholar with interest in the evolution of organism size as well as a commitment to scientific education and outreach.  Applicants with experience in quantitative paleobiology, evolutionary biology, and scientific education are particularly encouraged.  The post-doctoral fellow will coordinate and manage approximately 20 high school interns in collecting body size data from the fossil record in collaboration with the Director of Outreach Education and will analyze and write-up the data in collaboration with Prof. Jonathan Payne.  Program information is available at https://historyoflife.stanford.edu/. Funding will be provided for two years.

A starting date of September 1, 2019 is preferred but later starting dates are possible. Review of applications will commence on May 1, 2019 and the position will remain open until filled.

Stanford is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Please email a cover letter, CV, and the names and contact information for three references to jlpayne@stanford.edu

lunes, marzo 25, 2019

Seasonal paleontology assistant

Badlands Dinosaur Museum, Dickinson ND is hiring a seasonal paleontology intern. 40hrs pw, start and finish expected mid/late May to end Aug (flexible). Application Deadline 8th April. Please email me with any questions. denver.fowler@dickinsongov.com

Subsidized housing may be available, so we encourage applications from anyone currently able to work in the United States!

SEASONAL PALEONTOLOGY ASSISTANT
As part of its summer programming, Dickinson Museum Center is seeking a seasonal paleontology assistant for the 2019 summer tourist season, starting in mid-late May or early June (flexible), and lasting into August (at latest to Labor Day)

POSITION SUMMARY:

The seasonal paleontologist is a position that combines education & outreach, exhibit interpretation, and work in the preparation laboratory. The amount of time dedicated to each responsibility will depend on the ability and experience of the applicant.

About Badlands Dinosaur Museum:
Badlands Dinosaur Museum is a growing institution located on the 12 acre campus of Dickinson Museum Center in Dickinson, ND.The museum was founded in 1992 by Alice and Larry League and operated as Dakota Dinosaur Museum until 2015 whereupon it was acquired by the City of Dickinson. In 2016, Dr. Denver Fowler was hired as curator of paleontology and the museum was renamed as Badlands Dinosaur Museum in 2017.

Badlands Dinosaur Museum is undergoing a complete overhaul of the facility, exhibits, and programming. New fossil specimens are being collected by our fieldwork program that are prepared in our public viewing laboratory, which has a sliding window to allow visitors to ask questions. Fossil storage facilities have been upgraded to meet standards for a federal repository. Our evolving exhibit features new displays each year.

RESPONSIBILITIES
Essential duties:

• Assists in design of outreach and educational activities in paleontology that utilize the exhibit and education collection. May involve visiting groups or buildings outside of the museum campus.
• Implements outreach and educational programming in paleontology aimed at local population and regional summer tourism.
• Will offer interpretive assistance in the paleontology exhibit hall: answering visitor questions, giving short tours, and explaining exhibit content and core scientific concepts in paleontology.
• Assists in the public preparation laboratory in preparing specimens for exhibit and research.
• Provide general assistance to the curator and laboratory fossil preparator.
• Assists in outreach, special events, and donor development.
• Other duties as assigned.


Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

• Enrollment in a post-secondary educational program in a subject appropriate to Paleontology (e.g. Biology, Geology), or equivalent experience in a museum or education setting.
• Good general knowledge of paleontology, including being able to discuss core concepts with visitors and answer typical questions.
• Comfortable with public speaking in front of small groups and larger audiences.
• Willing and able to engage visitors in a friendly and approachable demeanor.
• Happy to work with children and families.
• Basic familiarity with fossil preparation methods.
• Ability to work independently on outreach & education and other fossil projects.
• Must be able to lift at least 25 pounds.
• Knowledge of appropriate specimen handling protocol.
• Demonstrable interest and knowledge of museums and their role in society.
• Basic proficiency with Microsoft Office software.
• Valid driver's license.

Additional desirable skills/experience:
• Prior experience in outreach and education.
• Prior experience working with children and families.
• Prior experience in a museum setting.
• Knowledge of anatomy, especially dinosaurs.

WORKING CONDITIONS
• Positions in this class typically require: talking, hearing, seeing and repetitive motions.
• Work is performed within routine office environment with minimal exposure to hazardous or unpleasant conditions. Physical demands are usually limited to sitting or standing in one location much of the time. Some stooping, lifting of objects may be required.
• Medium Work: Exerting up to 50 pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds of force constantly to move objects.

Compensation: $11.19 per hour (wage includes $1.25 per hour Skill-Based pay)

http://dickinsongov.com/2019/03/20/job-opening-museum-fossil-preparator-intern

domingo, marzo 24, 2019

Reconstruyendo cráneos de insectívoros fósil a partir de material fragmentario

Las aragosaureras Raquel Moya, Gloria Cuenca y Blanca Bauluz acaban de publicar un nuevo artículo en la revista PLOS ONE donde desarrollan una nueva metodología de la reconstrucción del cráneo de mamíferos sorícidos a partir de fragmentos.

Un problema común a la hora de estudiar y de hacer divulgación con determinadas especies extintas es que los fósiles correspondan a pequeños fragmentos y dientes sueltos y por tanto sea difícil saber por ejemplo cómo es un cráneo completo porque simplemente no se han conservado en el registro fósil. Esto es especialmente común en el estudio de microvertebrados (ratones, musarañas, murciélagos, pájaros, lagartijas, ranas, etc) con los que además está la dificultad añadida de su pequeño tamaño.


En este trabajo se explica una forma de resolver este problema y se ha aplicado en la reconstrucción de los cráneos y mandíbulas de dos musarañas de los yacimientos de Atapuerca: Beremendia fissidens y Dolinasorex glyphodon. Para ello se seleccionaron los fósiles más completos que se encontraron, aunque estaban concrecionados y no se podían ver bien, y otros fósiles complementarios para completar el cráneo. Para reconstruir la parte posterior del cráneo, como no hay fósiles, se utilizó una especie actual de características parecidas a las extintas.


Primero se digitalizaron todos los fósiles y el actual usando la microtomografía computarizada. Después se usaron distintos programas gratuitos de reconstrucciones y diseño 3D para limpiar y restaurar virtualmente los fósiles y generar los modelos. Además se duplicaron, escalaron y encajaron los fósiles necesarios para llegar a un cráneo completo de cada especie.


Finalmente pudimos comparar con especies actuales aspectos que de otra forma sería imposible como la forma del morro, la apertura de las mandíbulas o las cavidades internas del hocico de las musarañas. 


Aquí está el enlace a la publicación. En el apartado de “Supporting Information” se pueden descargar los modelos en formato 3D PDF para poder visualizar y ocultar dientes, mandíbulas y cráneo además de vídeos de las reconstrucciones entre otros materiales: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0213174

sábado, marzo 23, 2019

El paleontologo Paul Olsen

La noticia, hoy en una de las revistas científicas multidisciplinares de mayor difusión en el mundo, el PNAS, por Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences de Norteamérica, resalta el trabajo del paleontólogo de vertebrados y geólogo del cambio climático  el Profesor de la Universidad de Columbia (NY) Dr. Paul E. Olsen.
Olsen es miembro de la Academia Nacional de Ciencias de Norteamérica.

El geólogo Paul E. Olsen sigue un principio: obtener información del registro geológico no está disponible por otras fuentes. Al hacerlo, Olsen, profesor de ciencias de la tierra y del medio ambiente en el Observatorio de la Tierra Lamont-Doherty de la Universidad de Columbia (LDEO), pudo investigar la historia del Sistema Solar y la evolución de los ecosistemas continentales. Olsen, fue elegido para la Academia Nacional de Ciencias (de Norteamérica) en 2008, ha descubierto uno de los principales yacimientos de fósiles de vertebrados de América del Norte del límite Triásico-Jurásico. Ademas desarrolla el Geological Orrery, una red de registros mesozoicos del clima. Según el mismo Olsen: "Yo era uno de esos niños incómodos que sabían todos los nombres de los dinosaurios descritos en los libros para niños y jóvenes lectores de la década de 1950 y estaba feliz de contarles a todos sobre ellos". El adolescente Olsen fué presentado por el paleontologo Baird con la sedimentóloga Franklyn Van Houten de Princeton, quien había interpretado que las capas alternas grises y rojas de los estratos en la cuenca de Newark estaban marcadas por las variaciones en el clima del pasado...


En los últimos años, Olsen junto con sus estudiantes desarrolla perforaciones de cerca de recuperación de unos 6.000 metros de sedimentos del lago Triásico en Nueva Jersey para comprender la influencia de las variaciones de la órbita de la tierra en el clima tropical, y un análisis detallado de la gran extinción en masa de hace 200 millones de años, que preparó el escenario para el predominio de los dinosaurios que aparecieron poco después. Su novedoso enfoque de utilizar técnicas disponibles para comprender los sistemas biológicos y físicos de la antigua tierra y, en consecuencia, utilizar una amplia gama de disciplinas que incluyen geología estructural, palinología, geoquímica, geofísica y paleontología, es lo que le hace un paleontólogo y profesor único.


Iberodactylus, el pterosaurio más grande descubierto en la península Ibérica

Un equipo internacional liderado por Borja Holgado, investigador asociado al Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont (ICP) con la participación del grupo Aragosaurus-IUCA de la Universidad de Zaragoza, ha descrito la nueva especie de reptil volador Iberodactylus andreui. Se trata de un pterosaurio piscívoro de unos 4 metros de envergadura que vivió en la actual provincia de Teruel hace unos 125 millones de años. Es la tercera y más grande especie de este grupo que se describe en la península Ibérica.

El resto fósil que ha permitido describir la nueva especie fue hallado en un yacimiento de la localidad de Obón (unos 100 km al norte de la ciudad de Teruel) y consiste en la parte del morro del animal. Uno de los caracteres anatómicos distintivos de este pterosaurio es su cresta ósea, una protuberancia en la parte superior del cráneo. "La función de esta cresta no está clara, pero probablemente se trate de un carácter de dimorfismo sexual como se observa en otras especies de pterosaurios relacionadas con Iberodactylus", explica Borja Holgado, investigador asociado al ICP que lidera la investigación.

Los restos de pterosaurios son muy escasos en el registro fósil. Sus huesos son frágiles y huecos para facilitar el vuelo de animales tan grandes, y esto disminuye la probabilidad de que fosilicen. El holotipo, es decir el resto fósil que ha servido para describir la nueva especie Iberodactylus andreui, está depositado en las colecciones del Museo de Ciencias Naturales de la Universidad de Zaragoza. El nombre específico hace referencia a Javier Andreu, descubridor del fósil.


Iberodactylus andreui era un pterosaurio de gran envergadura, se estima que con las alas extendidas medía unos cuatro metros de punta a punta, más que cualquier ave actual. Es la más grande de las tres especies que se han descrito en la Península Ibérica. Los pterosaurios fueron el primer grupo de vertebrados que desarrolló el vuelo activo. La estructura de sus alas era parecida a la de los murciélagos actuales, con una gran membrana sujetada por la extremidad anterior que les permitía propulsarse, pero con la diferencia que estaba sujetada por un dedo hipertrofiado y no por toda la mano como en los murciélagos.

El resto encontrado conserva algunos dientes que han permitido deducir su alimentación. "La premaxila presenta algunas hileras de dientes cónicos que nos indican que se alimentaba de peces", comenta Jose Ignacio Canudo, jefe del grupo Aragosaurus de la Universidad de Zaragoza. Estudios recientes de las pequeñas abrasiones que dejan los alimentos en los dientes de los pterosaurios han revelado que dentro de este grupo había especies que se alimentaban de peces, mientras que otras cazaban vertebrados terrestres o insectos.

A pesar de que a menudo erróneamente se les llama "dinosaurios voladores", los pterosaurios no son dinosaurios, aunque están emparentados con ellos. Este grupo de reptiles surgió hace unos 228 millones de años, a finales del período Triásico, y dominó los cielos de la era Mesozoica durante más de 160 millones de años, extinguiéndose junto con los dinosaurios no avianos a finales del Cretácico, hace 66 millones de años. Actualmente se conocen un centenar de especies en todo el mundo que incluyen los animales voladores más grandes de todos los tiempos. Quetzalcoatlus, por ejemplo, se calcula que tenía 11 metros de envergadura, el tamaño de un pequeño avión.


berodactylus estaría emparentado con Hamipterus tianshanensis, una especie del Noroeste de China. Ambas especies han sido incluidas en una misma nueva familia, los Hamipteridae. La investigación también se centra en la evolución y diversificación del linaje Anhangueria, que incluye no sólo los hamiptéridos, sino también otros grandes pterosaurios piscívoros con cresta como Anhanguera piscator o Tropeognathus mesembrinus. El presente trabajo concluye que el origen de este linaje se situaría en las masas de tierra que hoy constituyen Eurasia.

La investigación ha sido publicada en la revista Scientific Reports. Está liderada por Borja Holgado, investigador asociado del Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont (ICP) y del Museo Nacional de Río de Janeiro (Brasil) conjuntamente con investigadores del Gupo Aragosaurus-IUCA (Universidad de Zaragoza), el Museo de Ciencias Naturales de la Universidad de Zaragoza, la Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (Brasil) y la Universidad Politécnica de Valencia. Alexander Kellner, participante en la investigación y director del Museu Nacional ha querido puntualizar que “a pesar del terrible incendio que destruyó el edificio principal de nuestra institución, el Museu Nacional vive a través de investigaciones como ésta”.

Imagen principal: Recreación en vida de distintos ejemplares de la nueva especie Iberodactylus andreui (Hugo Salais-López, Metazoa Studio)

Artículo original: Holgado, B., Pêgas, R.V., Canudo, J. I., Fortuny, J., Rodrigues, T., Company, J., Kellner, A. W. A. (2019). On a new crested pterodactyloid from the Early Cretaceous of the Iberian Peninsula and the radiation of the clade Anhangueria. Scientific Reports. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-41280-4

El dinosaurio corredor de las montañas: una nueva especie descrita en la Patagonia (Argentina)

La Patagonia argentina es una región que está proporcionando continuamente hallazgos científicos relevantes en el panorama mundial de la paleontología de dinosaurios. En los últimos años, investigadores del Grupo Aragosaurus-IUCA de la Universidad de Zaragoza han participado en la descripción de nuevas especies de dinosaurios patagónicos y el último caso es el de Mahuidacursor lipanglef, un nuevo ornitópodo recién publicado en la revista internacional Cretaceous Research. Se trata de un dinosaurio de talla mediana, herbívoro y poco común por sus características anatómicas. Este trabajo está liderado por la Dra. Penélope Cruzado-Caballero, investigadora del CONICET (y Universidad Nacional de Río Negro) de Argentina que realizó su tesis doctoral en la Universidad de Zaragoza, en colaboración con otro integrante actual del Grupo Aragosaurus-IUCA que es José Manuel Gasca, además de otros investigadores argentinos como Nacho Cerda del CONICET-UNRN, Leonardo Filippi del Museo “Argentino Urquiza” de Rincón de los Sauces y Alberto Garrido del Museo Olsacher de  Zapala.

En el norte de la Patagonia argentina, en afloramientos cretácicos del entorno de la ciudad de Rincón de los Sauces, provincia de Neuquén, el equipo del Museo “Argentino Urquiza” lleva realizando numerosos descubrimientos paleontológicos en los últimos años. En 2016, durante una salida de campo los técnicos del Museo de Rincón de los Sauces recolectaron unos fragmentos de huesos fósiles al pie de una pequeña loma donde afloran sedimentos de la Formación Bajo de la Carpa, de edad Santoniense (Cretácico Superior). Estos indicios dieron lugar posteriormente a la excavación de un esqueleto de dinosaurio articulado y exquisitamente preservado. Se trata de un esqueleto parcial que conserva vértebras cervicales, dorsales, costillas, cintura escapular y el brazo derecho casi completo. La apariencia general permitió desde un primer momento reconocer el ejemplar como perteneciente a un ornitópodo: un dinosaurio herbívoro, bípedo, de tamaño mediano y de aspecto grácil.

Los dinosaurios ornitópodos no son precisamente los dinosaurios más frecuentes en el registro fósil de Argentina, o al menos hasta ahora, ya que se conoce un mayor número de especies de otros tipos de dinosaurios herbívoros como los grandes saurópodos y también los terópodos (carnívoros) están mejor estudiados. Dentro de los dinosaurios ornitópodos, se conocen algunas especies de hadrosaurios (dinosaurios pico de pato) y también otras forman con características más primitivas y de menor tamaño que comúnmente se denominan “ornitópodos basales”. Dentro de este último grupo las relaciones de parentesco son confusas según el estado de conocimiento actual, ya que estos dinosaurios se parecen mucho entre sí y son sutiles las diferencias anatómicas que los caracterizan, es decir, son lo que se suelen llamarse formas muy conservativas. Sin embargo, descubrimientos recientes están permitiendo identificar la existencia de un grupo de ornitópodos basales que pudieron ser endémicos de Sudamérica (o quizá Gondwana) durante el Cretácico Superior y que comparten unas características anatómicas que son comunes entre sí pero diferenciadoras respecto a otros dinosaurios de parentesco cercano. 


Se ha interpretado que este grupo presenta un conjunto de modificaciones (principalmente en extremidades anteriores y posteriores) que pudieron ser biomecánicamente ventajosas a la hora de correr. Es posible que estas cualidades para ser corredores eficientes fueran determinantes para que este grupo de pequeños y medianos dinosaurios herbívoros tuvieran éxito y se diversificaran durante el Cretácico Superior en la región patagónica. Algunas de estas características relacionadas con adaptaciones a la carrera como la morfología especial del húmero se ha podido reconocer en la nueva especie Mahuidacursor lipanglef, cuyo nombre proveniente de la lengua mapuche, literalmente significa “corredor de las montañas” con “brazo ligero”.

La referencia completa del trabajo es:
Cruzado-Caballero, P., Gasca, J.M., Filippi, L.S., Cerda, I., Garrido, A.C. 2019. A new ornithopod dinosaur from the Santonian of Northern Patagonia (Rincón de los Sauces, Argentina). Cretaceous Research, 98, 211-229. DOI: 10.1016/j.cretres.2019.02.014
 

miércoles, marzo 20, 2019

El Antropoceno: ¿tiempo geológico o declaración política?


El Antropoceno es un concepto para expresar que la humanidad está cambiando el funcionamiento de la Tierra

La fuerza del concepto radica en su potencial para influir sobre la opinión pública y legitimar científicamente a las personas preocupadas por el cambio climático y la degradación ambiental. De ello hablará Alejandro Cearreta mañana jueves, 21 de Marzo a las 19 horas, en la Sala Pilar Sinués del Paraninfo de la Universidad de Zaragoza
 

A partir de los años 1950 el impacto antrópico se ha convertido en un fenómeno global y acelerado en todo el mundo. La población humana se ha triplicado, y el consumo y la tecnología se han convertido en los factores determinantes de nuestra influencia sobre el medio ambiente. Estos procesos aparecen ya reflejados en el registro geológico en forma de sustancias contaminantes, empobrecimiento de los restos fósiles, velocidad de acumulación de sedimentos, nuevos materiales y tecnofósiles, etc.

El Antropoceno es un concepto muy efectivo para expresar que la humanidad está cambiando el funcionamiento de la Tierra. La fuerza del concepto radica en su potencial para influir sobre la opinión pública y legitimar científicamente a las personas preocupadas por el cambio climático y la degradación ambiental. El concepto desafía el punto de vista tradicional de la Geología que siempre ha mirado hacia el pasado. Tiene la capacidad de convertirse en la unidad más politizada de la Escala del Tiempo Geológico y llevar a la clasificación geológica formal a un terreno desconocido.


ALEJANDRO CEARRETA
Licenciado en Geología por la Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU (1983) y doctor en Geología por la University of Exeter, UK (1987). Profesor titular de Micropaleontología en el Departamento de Estratigrafía y Paleontología de la UPV/EHU y profesor visitante en las universidades de São Paulo (Brasil) y Nacional Autónoma de México.

Responsable del Máster Universitario y del Programa de Doctorado en Cuaternario: Cambios Ambientales y Huella Humana. Miembro de la Junta Directiva de la Asociación Española para el Estudio del Cuaternario (AEQUA), miembro del Grupo de Trabajo sobre Antropoceno de la Comisión Internacional de Estratigrafía desde 2010, y evaluador del 5º Informe del Panel Intergubernamental sobre el Cambio Climático (2013).

Responsable del Grupo de Investigación Harea-Geología Litoral, y especialista en Cambios en el nivel del mar y Transformación natural y antrópica de la zona costera. Investigador principal de numerosos proyectos de investigación y publicaciones nacionales e internacionales.

Iberodactylus, el pterosaurio más grande descubierto en la península Ibérica

Un equipo internacional liderado por Borja Holgado, investigador asociado al Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont (ICP) con la participación del grupo Aragosaurus-IUCA de la Universidad de Zaragoza, ha descrito la nueva especie de reptil volador Iberodactylus andreui. Se trata de un pterosaurio piscívoro de unos 4 metros de envergadura que vivió en la actual provincia de Teruel hace unos 125 millones de años. Es la tercera y más grande especie de este grupo que se describe en la península Ibérica.

El resto fósil que ha permitido describir la nueva especie fue hallado en un yacimiento de la localidad de Obón (unos 100 km al norte de la ciudad de Teruel) y consiste en la parte del morro del animal. Uno de los caracteres anatómicos distintivos de este pterosaurio es su cresta ósea, una protuberancia en la parte superior del cráneo. "La función de esta cresta no está clara, pero probablemente se trate de un carácter de dimorfismo sexual como se observa en otras especies de pterosaurios relacionadas con Iberodactylus", explica Borja Holgado, investigador asociado al ICP que lidera la investigación.

Los restos de pterosaurios son muy escasos en el registro fósil. Sus huesos son frágiles y huecos para facilitar el vuelo de animales tan grandes, y esto disminuye la probabilidad de que fosilicen. El holotipo, es decir el resto fósil que ha servido para describir la nueva especie Iberodactylus andreui, está depositado en las colecciones del Museo de Ciencias Naturales de la Universidad de Zaragoza. El nombre específico hace referencia a Javier Andreu, descubridor del fósil.


berodactylus andreui era un pterosaurio de gran envergadura, se estima que con las alas extendidas medía unos cuatro metros de punta a punta, más que cualquier ave actual. Es la más grande de las tres especies que se han descrito en la Península Ibérica. Los pterosaurios fueron el primer grupo de vertebrados que desarrolló el vuelo activo. La estructura de sus alas era parecida a la de los murciélagos actuales, con una gran membrana sujetada por la extremidad anterior que les permitía propulsarse, pero con la diferencia que estaba sujetada por un dedo hipertrofiado y no por toda la mano como en los murciélagos.

El resto encontrado conserva algunos dientes que han permitido deducir su alimentación. "La premaxila presenta algunas hileras de dientes cónicos que nos indican que se alimentaba de peces", comenta Jose Ignacio Canudo, jefe del grupo Aragosaurus de la Universidad de Zaragoza. Estudios recientes de las pequeñas abrasiones que dejan los alimentos en los dientes de los pterosaurios han revelado que dentro de este grupo había especies que se alimentaban de peces, mientras que otras cazaban vertebrados terrestres o insectos.

A pesar de que a menudo erróneamente se les llama "dinosaurios voladores", los pterosaurios no son dinosaurios, aunque están emparentados con ellos. Este grupo de reptiles surgió hace unos 228 millones de años, a finales del período Triásico, y dominó los cielos de la era Mesozoica durante más de 160 millones de años, extinguiéndose junto con los dinosaurios no avianos a finales del Cretácico, hace 66 millones de años. Actualmente se conocen un centenar de especies en todo el mundo que incluyen los animales voladores más grandes de todos los tiempos. Quetzalcoatlus, por ejemplo, se calcula que tenía 11 metros de envergadura, el tamaño de un pequeño avión.


berodactylus estaría emparentado con Hamipterus tianshanensis, una especie del Noroeste de China. Ambas especies han sido incluidas en una misma nueva familia, los Hamipteridae. La investigación también se centra en la evolución y diversificación del linaje Anhangueria, que incluye no sólo los hamiptéridos, sino también otros grandes pterosaurios piscívoros con cresta como Anhanguera piscator o Tropeognathus mesembrinus. El presente trabajo concluye que el origen de este linaje se situaría en las masas de tierra que hoy constituyen Eurasia.

La investigación ha sido publicada en la revista Scientific Reports. Está liderada por Borja Holgado, investigador asociado del Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont (ICP) y del Museo Nacional de Río de Janeiro (Brasil) conjuntamente con investigadores del Gupo Aragosaurus-IUCA (Universidad de Zaragoza), el Museo de Ciencias Naturales de la Universidad de Zaragoza, la Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (Brasil) y la Universidad Politécnica de Valencia. Alexander Kellner, participante en la investigación y director del Museu Nacional ha querido puntualizar que “a pesar del terrible incendio que destruyó el edificio principal de nuestra institución, el Museu Nacional vive a través de investigaciones como ésta”.

Imagen principal: Recreación en vida de distintos ejemplares de la nueva especie Iberodactylus andreui (Hugo Salais-López, Metazoa Studio)

Artículo original: Holgado, B., Pêgas, R.V., Canudo, J. I., Fortuny, J., Rodrigues, T., Company, J., Kellner, A. W. A. (2019). On a new crested pterodactyloid from the Early Cretaceous of the Iberian Peninsula and the radiation of the clade Anhangueria. Scientific Reports. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-41280-4

martes, marzo 05, 2019

University of California is seeking a postdoctoral scholar to carry out research on a NSF-funded

The Department of Earth Sciences at the University of California at Santa Barbara is seeking a postdoctoral scholar to carry out research on a NSF-funded project: "Using organic carbon isotopes of single microfossils to illuminate Proterozoic eukaryotic ecosystems ”. The project will be carried out at UCSB, Syracuse University, and Williams College.

Basic Qualifications: Applicants must have completed all requirements for a PhD (or equivalent) except the dissertation at the time of application.

Additional Qualifications: 1 year PhD research experience in stable isotope geochemistry and/or micropaleontology. PhD conferral at the time of appointment required.

Preferred Qualifications: Research interest and experience in studying isotopes, the habitats and metabolisms of early eukaryotes, and microfossil picking. Be able to analyze bulk, kerogen, and fossil samples that span the history of Proterozoic eukaryotes. Excellent interpersonal and communication skills to work independently, under direction and also collaboratively within a multidisciplinary research teams.

Important details: The fellowship is for 2 years and also includes funds for travel to conferences. For primary consideration apply by April 15, 2019. Open until filled. Position is expected to begin on August 1, 2019. 


To apply, please upload a cover letter, CV, Research Background and Interest Letter, no more than three publications (optional), and contact information for three references to: https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/JPF01469. Email Susannah Porter at porter@geol.ucsb.edu for any questions related to the position.

Project details: Recent advances in NanoEA-IRMS now allow us to reliably measure the carbon isotopic composition of a single organic microfossil and compare that value to the bulk δ13C. We seek to use this new technique to explore how organic carbon isotopes can illuminate two persistent unknowns in the Proterozoic Earth-life system: What were the habitats and metabolisms of early eukaryotes? What can single microfossil δ13C reveal about the controls on bulk δ13Corg in the Proterozoic stratigraphic record? We will approach these questions by analyzing bulk, kerogen, and fossil δ13Corg samples from four fossiliferous units that span the history of Proterozoic eukaryotes. The Postdoctoral Fellow will lead the research efforts, overseen by all three PIs. They will be responsible for macerating fossiliferous samples and microfossil picking, and will run many of the δ13Corg analyses (at Syracuse University). They will be a primary participant in data analysis and interpretation, manuscript preparation, and research dissemination. They will also help the PIs develop educational initiatives, and mentor undergraduate research assistants from Williams, Syracuse, and/or UCSB.

The University is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service as appropriate to the position.

miércoles, febrero 27, 2019

Are you interested in outreach and education in paleontology?

Are you interested in outreach and education in paleontology?

The Paleontological Society offers outreach and education grants to support activities involving educational outreach and community engagement in paleontology.

Potentially fundable projects include (but are not limited to):
- opportunities for undergraduates to become involved in paleontological outreach
- development of new educational “apps” or technologies
- production of educational materials that could be distributed more widely
- field trips to fossil sites and/or museums for teachers and pre-college students
- educator training and curriculum development
- participation in local community initiatives
- development of educational materials for classroom use
- website or other online material development

Amount of grant
Up to $2,500 per grant

Deadline
Friday March 2, 2019

To learn more, please see:
http://paleosoc.org/grants-and-awards/paleontological-society-outreach-and-education-grant/

Questions?
Please email Rowan Lockwood (rxlock@wm.edu) rather than replying to Paleonet.

martes, febrero 26, 2019

9th interdisciplinary course SCIENCE & PAST

The Environmental Sciences Institute (IUCA) of the University of Zaragoza is organizing the 9th interdisciplinary course SCIENCE & PAST, to be held in Zaragoza (Spain) on March 13-15, 2019.
 

This edition "Science and Past: Studying and Preserving Organic and Biomaterial Heritage" is focused on the development and use of scientific techniques in order to extract archaeological, historical and conservation information from organic and biomaterials belonging to our cultural heritage. In this edition, special focus will be given on understand and preserve these type of materials through an in-depth scientific approach.

The lectures are addressed to students, researchers and professionals in chemistry, physics, geology, biology, archaeology, conservation science, palaeontology, etc., to acquire a solid knowledge on the state of art of this topic, applied to the study, safeguarding, conservation and authentication of material heritage.

DOWNLOAD PROGRAM (FINAL PROGRAM)


REGISTRATION
Please use this on-line registration form for the registration

Registration fees:
Early registration (until February 27th, 2019): 80 € students; 150 € seniors.
Late registration (from February 28th, 2019): 100 € students; 200 € seniors.

Students form the University or Zaragoza: 20 €

More information: http://iuca.unizar.es/noticia/science-and-past-studying-and-preserving-organic-and-biomaterial-heritage/